Tuesday, May 11, 2010

Hip Pad Optional

During the BEST MOTHER'S DAY EVER, I managed to pick up this little number for $2.00 while at an antique mall with my daughter.

Vogue Special Design S-4821



I don't think I'd ever really wear this dress, but it is very very cool. From the description:

"Tucked Skirt with soft pleats at side fronts and side back, joins bodice at waist-line. Shaped collar, self fabric tie. Long fitted and very short sleeves. Hip pad optional."

It was the "hip pad optional" line that called to me. During the New Look period (1947 to 1957 for the Dior years) hip pads were often inserted into skirts to exaggerate the difference between hip and waist. (Sometimes a girdle/corset can use a little help.)

Here is how yoou would insert the hip pad into the dress: attached to an inner belt. I have installed an inner belt into a very full-skirted 50's dress to provide stability, but I have never attached anything to it before.



I wish this pattern had a better full on view, so I could see how the hips are exaggerated. Ah well.

Another thing I really like about this pattern is the instructions they give on possible alterations:


And for those who like it, here is the back of the envelope (clicking on any of the pictures will make them bigger):

7 comments:

Tasia said...

Isn't it funny to see hip pads in a dress pattern, in a world where we try and minimize our hips and celebrities strive for narrow boyish figures? I'd do SO much better in the 40's/50's world of hip pads :)

Angela said...

That's pretty neat! Hip pads? I don't think I would need any of those in my dresses.

The Slapdash Sewist said...

Oh wow, I had no idea hip pads were used in the 50s! I thought that had gone out with hoop skirts and panniers. If I only had the matching bust, I would have killed in the 50s. No need for hip pads here.

Faye Lewis said...

Amazing. Never heard of them. So if you didn't have hips, you could sew you some.

Sarah @ ColorKitten said...

I saw that pattern on ebay a while back (and it went for a lot more than $2, I believe) -- I knew I'd never make it but the envelope was great, handwritten on it were two things:

"black wool crepe Mar '48 (Rodier)"
and
"What a job!!"

I bet it was, hip pads and all!

~Sherry~ said...

These are like a mini-pannier - anything to get the required silhouette!

Bonnie said...

In the 1700s women wore "panniers" which meant bread basket at their hips. I remember learning in costume history that they had to build doors wide enough for them to walk through! I believe that coincided with the beginnings of ballet - which makes sense when you think of what they had to do to move around gracefully in their attire!